We took the plunge and agreed to host a wedding reception at Milton. The bridal couple was from Essex and left much of the organisation to us. In discussions over the summer we ironed out the arrangements, but finding them a piper was by far the hardest piece in the nuptial jigsaw puzzle.
MelOflynnWebThey chose to marry on August 11, which happened to clash with the Aberfeldy Show and the World Piping Championships. Every piper we contacted was involved with one or the other. Lucky for the couple, Big Duncan from Killin saved the day and delighted the wedding party with his music.
That night the pointy marquee lit up like a visiting spaceship in the middle of the Glenlyon wilderness was an amazing sight. When all was done and the final firework had echoed impressively off the surrounding hills, my husband and I sat down inside the tent to savour the day. It was very unreal to slump back on a sofa under the chandeliers. It felt like we’d been transported to a VIP lounge in Ibiza. Only the day before, this crisp white space had been our car park. 

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There was great excitement in the Glen when posters went up for a new event, The Glenlyon Highland Fling. The school was raising money for an outdoor classroom and music and merriment was planned for an evening at Fortingall’s Molteno Hall.
A raffle offering generous prizes was a big hit on the night, with most agreeing the top prize to be a day’s hind stalking on the Meggernie beat. Many people had a shot at winning, but it happened that the partner of the stalker in question bagged the prize. Needless to say, heartless Mark said he would have his fun and make Lauren crawl through every peat hag on the hill.

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The coming of Autumn is always more advanced here than in temperate Aberfeldy. A beech tree near the house always turns first, weeks ahead of its neighbours. It has always been so. The tree’s change of heart in the last week of August always thrills me, as I’m one who relishes the season of lambswool and big socks.
With the first yellow birch leaves to litter the ground also comes a sprouting of chanterelles. Seared smartly with butter in a frying pan, they make a nice addition to the cooked breakfasts we serve to our B&B guests.

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The other day at the PA I had a front page ‘splash’, as it’s called in the newspaper business. I heard from Tayside Fire and Rescue that they’d spent an hour trying to get an upside-down horse out of a ditch somewhere near Scone.
Details were sparse, so I delayed driving home to see if I could find out more. Having nearly beached my low-slung car driving up farm tracks and risked being eaten by several over- responsive guard dogs, I found my story. Speaking to the rider, who was thankfully unharmed, I discovered she’d only escaped being trapped under her mare by shedding her wellies. If she’d heeded advice and worn snug-fitting leather boots, she would never have freed herself from the stirrups.
Sometimes it pays to break the rules.

 

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